Adolescent dating abuse perpetrator

Youth victims of dating violence are more likely to experience depression and anxiety symptoms, engage in unhealthy behaviors like using tobacco, drugs and alcohol, exhibit antisocial behaviors, and think about suicide.

Additionally, research suggests that teen dating violence patterns change rapidly over a short time period as adolescents grow older, thus dating violence services for young people need to be accessible, available, adaptable and safe.

There is a large number of diverse youth dating abuse victims, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning (LGBTQ) individuals, immigrants, those with limited English proficiency, and those who may be religiously affiliated who indicate they have not disclosed abuse to anyone.

Youth also report concerns that the abuse will be disclosed to their parents and/or Child Protective Services, or that their partners will be notified, thus subjecting them to more abuse.

These are important gaps which could benefit from additional resource development and technical assistance.

Nearly 1.5 million high school students nationwide experience physical abuse from a dating partner in a single year.

Of primary concern are aspects of life over which adults have much more control, for example, teens may have little input over their schedules, which schools they attend, how to get to and from school, activities in which to participate, where they work, or where they worship.

Additionally, many teen and adult victims alike experience abuse which intersects with discrimination and institutional biases based on race, culture, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, immigration status, and language barriers among others, that make abuse harder to overcome and create additional challenges to receiving desperately needed services.

According to the 2017 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Systems (YRBSS) conducted by the Centers for Disease Control, 8% of high school students surveyed had experienced physical violence by someone they were dating and nearly 10% of students had experienced sexual violence, including non-consensual sex.

The effect of teen dating violence on physical health, mental health, and educational outcomes is significant.

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